clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Jordan Morris likely heading back to Stanford

New, 40 comments

Whether or not it's all about money, as a recent report suggests, is not as clear.

Michael Steele/Getty Images

Jordan Morris probably won't be suiting up for the Seattle Sounders in 2015. At least that's how it appears today. Sounder at Heart has been able to confirm that the Stanford sophomore is likely heading back to school -- as first reported by American Soccer Now -- but it's unclear if the Seattle Sounders Academy product's decision is as much about money as that story suggests.

Although the report implies United States manager Jurgen Klinsmann could push Morris toward Europe -- as has been rumored ever since Morris became the first collegian to play for the USMNT since 1994 -- the damning evidence is submitted by an unnamed "industry source" who seems to be sharing more of their opinion than anything else. Morris, the son of the Sounders' team doctor, has been consistent in saying education is important to him and that finishing school has always been something he's interested in doing. Turning pro after less than two years in college would hardly make getting a degree impossible, but it makes it much more difficult.

While the ASN story paints with a pretty wide brush -- casting Morris into the same category as unaffiliated underclassmen who have rejected "low-ball" Generation Adidas contracts from MLS -- history suggests teams have more latitude when trying to sign Homegrown Players. The LA Galaxy, for instance, signed Gyasi Zardes to a deal that paid him nearly $200,000 in guaranteed compensation in 2014 and about $175,000 his rookie year, according to MLS Players Union documents. That's more than any Generation Adidas player was paid in either of the last two seasons.

The Sounders likely have the ability to impress upon MLS to offer more money if they think losing Morris to Europe is a real possibility and it remains likely that the 20-year-old really just wants to stay in school. Time will tell, but this doesn't seem quite like the time to panic.